Christmas Tree Varieties

All kinds to choose from

For many years, trees were associated with pagan rituals. The Romans decorated evergreen bushes and trees during the ancient festival of Saturnalia. Celtic Druids honored their gods by tying tributes to tree branches during the rites of winter solstice. Today, we use trees as the focal point of our holiday decorating. While any old Christmas tree will do for some, others prefer a particolar species or variety of tree. Here are the most popolar Christmas tree varieties and the key features of each.

In the chart below the following items are rated by the following methods:

  1. Needle retention, fragrance and needle softness are rated as fair, good or excellent.

  2. Needle retention refers to the tree's ability to keep its needles.

  3. Fragrance refers to how pleasing its fragrance.

  4. Needle softness. How soft or resilient the needles are.

Variety

Key Features

Needle Retention

Fragrance

Needle Softness

Balsam Fir

Dark green color; attractive appearance; ¾" to 1 ½", flat needles

Fair

Excellent

Excellent

Douglas Fir

Dark, blue-green color; drooping, spreading branches; 1" - 1 ½" needles that radiate in all directions

Good

Excellent

Excellent

Scotch Pine

Bright, green color; open appearance; stiff branches; 1" - 3" needles; most common Christmas tree

Excellent

Fair

Fair

White Pine

Blue-green color; foll appearance; 2" - 5" needles bundled in sets of 5

Good

Fair

Excellent

White Spruce

Blue-green color; foll appearance; 2" - 5" needles bundled in sets of 5

Good

Fair

Excellent

Norway Spruce

Dark, shiny green color; good conical appearance; ½" - 1" needles

Fair

Excellent

Good

Norway Spruce

Dark green to powdery-blue color; long, symmetrical appearance; stiff branches; ¾" - 1 ½" stiff needles

Excellent

Good

Good

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